Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

What is Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)?

ADHD is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders of childhood and can persist through adolescence and into adulthood. Currently the causes are unknown.

A person with ADHD has a chronic level of inattention, impulsive hyperactivity, or both such that daily functioning is compromised. The symptoms of the disorder must be present at levels that are higher than expected for a person's developmental stage and must interfere with the person's ability to function in different settings (e.g., in school and at home). A person with ADHD may struggle in important areas of life, such as peer and family relationships, and school or work performance. 

Three types of ADHD have been established according to which symptoms are strongest in the individual. These types are described below:

  1. Predominantly Inattentive Type: It is hard for the individual to organize or finish a task, to pay attention to details, or to follow instructions or conversations. The person is easily distracted or forgets details of daily routines.
     

  2. Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: The person fidgets and talks a lot. It is hard to sit still for long (e.g., for a meal or while doing homework). Smaller children may run, jump or climb constantly. The individual feels restless and has trouble with impulsivity. Someone who is impulsive may interrupt others a lot, grab things from people, or speak at inappropriate times. It is hard for the person to wait their turn or listen to directions. A person with impulsiveness may have more accidents and injuries than others.
     

  3. Combined Type: Symptoms of the above two types are equally predominant in the person.

As many as half of those with ADHD also have other mental disorders. These comorbidities of ADHD (other disorders that occur along with ADHD) can make it harder to diagnose and treat ADHD. They may also present further challenges to the individual with ADHD.

Used by mental health professionals, the DSM-IV-TR provides criteria for diagnosing ADHD. This diagnostic standard helps ensure that people are appropriately diagnosed and treated for ADHD. Using the same standard across communities will help determine the public health impact of ADHD. 

Treating ADHD can be done through medical or behavioral therapies, or a combination of the two. 

ADHD — Establishing a Treatment Plan

Part of treating Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is understanding the possible causes and origins of this disorder. And while it is one of the most studied conditions of childhood, the cause of ADHD is still not clear at this time.
 

However, the research done to date has shown the following:

Research also has shown that there is no evidence that ADHD is caused by the following:

While the causes of ADHD may not be clear, the outlook for most children who receive treatment for ADHD is very encouraging. There is no specific cure for ADHD, but there are many treatment options available.

Each child's treatment must be tailored to meet individual needs. In most cases, treatment for ADHD should include the following:

Treatment for ADHD uses the same principles that are used to treat other chronic conditions like asthma or diabetes. Long-term planning is needed because these conditions continue or recur for a long time. Families must manage them on an ongoing basis. In the case of ADHD, schools and other caregivers also must be involved in managing the condition.

Educating the people involved about ADHD is a key part of treating your child. As a parent, you will need to learn about ADHD. Read about the condition and talk to people who understand it. This will help you manage the ways ADHD affects your child and your family on a day-to-day basis. It also will help your child learn to help himself.

At the beginning of treatment, your pediatrician should set three to six "target outcomes" (goals) for your child's behavior. These goals will guide the treatment plan. Your child's target outcomes should focus on helping her function as well as possible at home, at school and in your community.
 

The following are examples of target outcomes:

The target outcomes should be

Your child's treatment plan will be set up to help your child achieve these goals.

Diseases&Treatments

Disclaimer: This information is intended as a guide only.   This information is offered to you with the understanding that it not be interpreted as medical or professional advice.  All medical information needs to be carefully reviewed with your health care provider.

 Women

* What is Menopause

* Symptoms

* Hormone 
   Replacement 
   Therapy

* Vitamins &
    Minerals

* Osteoporosis

* Heart Disease

* Psychological 
   Function 
   and Menopause

*Weight Loss 

* Sexual Health

*Diseases Information

*Bacterial Diseases

*Minerals Information

* Vitamins Information

* Health & Beauty

* Healthy Baby

__________________

T. J. Clark Products  Liquid Vitamins & Minerals, Colloidal Minerals & Specialty Dietary Health Supplements. 

Valeriia.com - Mineral Cosmetic for women, men and children.

Business opportunities with Valeriia

 

* Health-e-Club

Men

* What is Male 
    Menopause

* Symptoms

* Sex and Male
   Menopause  

* Impotence

* Help with 
   Andropausal
   Symptoms

* Testosterone 
    Solution